Arduino + USB Host Shield + 3G Modem + GPS = Realtime Tracking

This project is the development of tracking systems for all the moves that will be inserted into the database for each movement is read by its NMEA GPS will be delivered via 3G or GPRS networks. The position will be received by the GPS location of the next satellite position location is transmitted via 3G or GPRS network via a modem to a specific IP address database already installed. The data from the database is read by a program created by integrating Google Maps with the database. Simple concept, of course, the concept should be tested by observing the weather, gravity, velocity readings by GPS and speed data transmission by modem 3G or GPRS to the database. Implementation will be applied to the tracking system for train travel. So that will be read by the master control center of the train which started from there, the speed, the distance between the train and even the density of room inside the train but it also can be made ​​automatic for each station announcer who passed and will pass by the train.

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USB Host Shield

• Suppot Google ADK
• Compatible with more Arduinos
• Included stackable connectors
• No more SPI re-wiring and code modifications

The DFRobot USB Host Shield is an add-on board for Arduino development platform. The shield provides USB Host interface, allowing full and low-speed communication with USB devices – keyboards, mice, joysticks, MIDI, digital cameras, Bluetooth, and many others.

It is revision 2.0 of USB Host Shield compatible with more Arduinos – not only UNO and Duemilanove, but also big Mega and Mega 2560 work with Standard variant of this shield out of the box. No more SPI re-wiring and code modifications – just solder included stackable connectors. It is worth noting that both variants of the shield are built on the same PCB, therefore it is possible to make one variant from another by adding/removing parts.

Modem EVDO Rev. B AC2791

Radio CDMA2000 2X EVDO Rev.B
800/1900 MHz
Data transfer DL 9.3 Mbps / UL 5.4 Mbps
Dimension 89 x 27.5 x 11.1 mm
OS Windows® 2000/XP/Vista, Win7, Mac

Flexiview FV-1 (Android TV)

● The main chip is CORTEX A8 core, Samsung S5PV210, frequency up to 1GHz, 512MB    memory, built-in 2G memory space.
● Android2.2 operating system
● Built-in WiFi module.
● RJ45 interface for wired network connection.
● Support 1080P video playback.
● HDMI video output. Connect to Hi-definition television through the interface, and to    play high-definition video .
● USBinterface for connecting a high-capacity mobile hard disk, and can connect
   a mouse and keyboard to operate
● Weather, calendar and desktop clock tool
● Support Wireless Bluetooth keyboard
● Bluetooth File Transfer
● Support for 2.4G wireless remote control operation
● Support FLASH PLAYER 10.1, including online video playability
● Support for music playback, photo browsing, and enjoy more family entertainment
● SD card expansion

125 Khz RFID Module RDM630 UART

RDM630 125KHz card reader mini-module is designed for reading code from 125KHz card compatible read-only tags and read/write card . It can be applied in office/home security, personal identification, access control, anti-forgery, interactive toy and production control systems etc.

FEATURES :

  • Support external antenna
  • Maximum effective distance up to 150mm
  • Less than 100ms decoding time
  • Wiegand interface
  • Support EM4100 compatible read only or read/write tags
  • Built-in external bi-color LED and buzzer driver
  • Small outline design

Datasheet here.

Sample code for Arduino

Note: Module will notify whenever 125khz tag approaches, tag serial number will be send via IO pin and save UART port for MCU. Either interupt or polling mode is OK to read the ID, Arduino library pending.

Infrared Switch (Adjustable Range)

Introduction

This is an infrared distance switch. It has an adjustable detection range, 3cm – 80cm.  It is small, easy to use/assemble, inexpensive. Useful for robot, interactive media, industrial assembly line, etc.
Specification

  • Power supply: 5V
  • Current:100mA
  • Range:3-80cm adjustable
  • Red: +5V; Yellow:Signal;Green:GND

IComSat v1.1 – SIM900 GSM/GPRS Shield for Arduino

IComSat V1.1-1-500x500IComSat V1.1-3-500x500

Overview

IComSat adalah GSM/GPRS Shield untuk Arduino yang berdasarkan atas modul SIM900 Quad-band GSM/GPRS. Dikendalikan menggunakan AT commands (GSM 07.07, 07.05 dan AT commands SIMCOM yang lebih ditingkatkan) dan cocok (compatible) dengan board Arduino (Uno dan Mega 2560).

Sekarang IComsat sudah di-update dari v1.0 ke v1.1. Apa yang baru di versi 1.1:

  • Support the software power on
  • Add the 3.5mm socket for microphone and earphone interface on shield

Fitur

  • Quad-Band 850/ 900/ 1800/ 1900 MHz
  • GPRS multi-slot class 10/8
  • GPRS mobile station class B
  • Compliant to GSM phase 2/2+
  • Class 4 (2 W @850/ 900 MHz)
  • Class 1 (1 W @ 1800/1900MHz)
  • Control via AT commands (GSM 07.07 ,07.05 and SIMCOM enhanced AT Commands)
  • Low power consumption: 1.5mA (sleep mode)
  • Operation temperature: -40°C to +85 °C

Gambar skema koneksi antara Arduino dengan GSM/GPRS Modul.

GPRSArduino-Connection

XBoard-A bridge between home and internet (Arduino Compatible)

The XBoard is a unique Arduino board which features a WIZnet ethernet port, an XBee socket, and an ATMega328. This board will add wireless XBee control as well as internet connectivity to your projects. Its great for anything from home automation to robot control. The possibilities are endless!

It has 8 Analog I/O pins and 8 digital pins, 4 of which have PWM (indicated by an asterisk). It is compatible with all XBee modules, and also comes with an integrated socket for APC220 RF Module or DF-Bluetooth Module. The XBoard can be programmedn via an FTDI programmer or via the ICSP header. Power is provided through a Mini USB connector.

You can setup a web server through which you may communicate with a remote Arduino using XBee radios, bluetooth or APC modules. This information can be posted to a web site, or to Twitter.

We have used our XBoard to control our office door from the internet. All we need to do if we forget our RFID badge is to login to our office WiFi and send the command to open the door! We have created a project guide which includes the list of parts, and source code to get this project going for yourself.

The board requires FTDI basic board to upload sketch. It can be powered by a mini USB or our Lipo battery.

Specification

  • MCU:Atmega328P low voltage version (16Mhz)
  • Ethernet:WIZ5100
  • Arduino FIO Bootloader
  • Supply voltage:5V
  • Output voltage:3.3V
  • Digital IO: 8
  • Analog In: 8

Optional Components

Note: By using the Xbee S2, the x-board will have the capability to establish a wireless network which is able to control up to 255 end points.  Other wirless modules only support Point to Point communication.

Documents

Ethernet Shield

Overview

The Arduino Ethernet Shield connects your Arduino to the internet in mere minutes. Just plug this module onto your Arduino board, connect it to your network with an RJ45 cable (not included) and follow a few simple instructions to start controlling your world through the internet. As always with Arduino, every element of the platform – hardware, software and documentation – is freely available and open-source. This means you can learn exactly how it’s made and use its design as the starting point for your own circuits. Hundreds of thousands of Arduino boards are already fueling people’s creativity all over the world, everyday. Join us now, Arduino is you!

 

  • Requires and Arduino board (not included)
  • Operating voltage 5V (supplied from the Arduino Board)
  • Ethernet Controller: W5100 with internal 16K buffer
  • Connection speed: 10/100Mb
  • Connection with Arduino on SPI port

 

Description

The Arduino Ethernet Shield allows an Arduino board to connect to the internet. It is based on the Wiznet W5100 ethernet chip (datasheet). The Wiznet W5100 provides a network (IP) stack capable of both TCP and UDP. It supports up to four simultaneous socket connections. Use the Ethernet library to write sketches which connect to the internet using the shield. The ethernet shield connects to an Arduino board using long wire-wrap headers which extend through the shield. This keeps the pin layout intact and allows another shield to be stacked on top.

 

The most recent revision of the board exposes the 1.0 pinout on rev 3 of the Arduino UNO board.

 

The Ethernet Shield has a standard RJ-45 connection, with an integrated line transformer and Power over Ethernet enabled.

 

There is an onboard micro-SD card slot, which can be used to store files for serving over the network. It is compatible with the Arduino Uno and Mega (using the Ethernet library). The onboard microSD card reader is accessible through the SD Library. When working with this library, SS is on Pin 4. The original revision of the shield contained a full-size SD card slot; this is not supported.

 

The shield also includes a reset controller, to ensure that the W5100 Ethernet module is properly reset on power-up. Previous revisions of the shield were not compatible with the Mega and need to be manually reset after power-up.

 

The current shield has a Power over Ethernet (PoE) module designed to extract power from a conventional twisted pair Category 5 Ethernet cable:

  • IEEE802.3af compliant
  • Low output ripple and noise (100mVpp)
  • Input voltage range 36V to 57V
  • Overload and short-circuit protection
  • 9V Output
  • High efficiency DC/DC converter: typ 75% @ 50% load
  • 1500V isolation (input to output)

 

NB: the Power over Ethernet module is proprietary hardware not made by Arduino, it is a third party accessory. For more information, see the datasheet

 

The shield does not come with the PoE module built in, it is a separate component that must be added on.

 

Arduino communicates with both the W5100 and SD card using the SPI bus (through the ICSP header). This is on digital pins 11, 12, and 13 on the Duemilanove and pins 50, 51, and 52 on the Mega. On both boards, pin 10 is used to select the W5100 and pin 4 for the SD card. These pins cannot be used for general i/o. On the Mega, the hardware SS pin, 53, is not used to select either the W5100 or the SD card, but it must be kept as an output or the SPI interface won’t work.

 

Note that because the W5100 and SD card share the SPI bus, only one can be active at a time. If you are using both peripherals in your program, this should be taken care of by the corresponding libraries. If you’re not using one of the peripherals in your program, however, you’ll need to explicitly deselect it. To do this with the SD card, set pin 4 as an output and write a high to it. For the W5100, set digital pin 10 as a high output.

 

The shield provides a standard RJ45 ethernet jack.

 

The reset button on the shield resets both the W5100 and the Arduino board.

 

The shield contains a number of informational LEDs:

 

  • PWR: indicates that the board and shield are powered 
  • LINK: indicates the presence of a network link and flashes when the shield transmits or receives data 
  • FULLD: indicates that the network connection is full duplex 
  • 100M: indicates the presence of a 100 Mb/s network connection (as opposed to 10 Mb/s) 
  • RX: flashes when the shield receives data 
  • TX: flashes when the shield sends data 
  • COLL: flashes when network collisions are detected

 

The solder jumper marked “INT” can be connected to allow the Arduino board to receive interrupt-driven notification of events from the W5100, but this is not supported by the Ethernet library. The jumper connects the INT pin of the W5100 to digital pin 2 of the Arduino.

Arduino Mega 2560


Overview

The Arduino Mega is a microcontroller board based on the ATmega1280 (datasheet). It has 54 digital input/output pins (of which 14 can be used as PWM outputs), 16 analog inputs, 4 UARTs (hardware serial ports), a 16 MHz crystal oscillator, a USB connection, a power jack, an ICSP header, and a reset button. It contains everything needed to support the microcontroller; simply connect it to a computer with a USB cable or power it with a AC-to-DC adapter or battery to get started. The Mega is compatible with most shields designed for the Arduino Duemilanove or Diecimila.

Schematic & Reference Design

EAGLE files: arduino-mega-reference-design.zip

Schematic: arduino-mega-schematic.pdf

Summary

Microcontroller ATmega1280
Operating Voltage 5V
Input Voltage (recommended) 7-12V
Input Voltage (limits) 6-20V
Digital I/O Pins 54 (of which 14 provide PWM output)
Analog Input Pins 16
DC Current per I/O Pin 40 mA
DC Current for 3.3V Pin 50 mA
Flash Memory 128 KB of which 4 KB used by bootloader
SRAM 8 KB
EEPROM 4 KB
Clock Speed 16 MHz

Power

The Arduino Mega can be powered via the USB connection or with an external power supply. The power source is selected automatically.

External (non-USB) power can come either from an AC-to-DC adapter (wall-wart) or battery. The adapter can be connected by plugging a 2.1mm center-positive plug into the board’s power jack. Leads from a battery can be inserted in the Gnd and Vin pin headers of the POWER connector.

The board can operate on an external supply of 6 to 20 volts. If supplied with less than 7V, however, the 5V pin may supply less than five volts and the board may be unstable. If using more than 12V, the voltage regulator may overheat and damage the board. The recommended range is 7 to 12 volts.

The power pins are as follows:

  • VIN.The input voltage to the Arduino board when it’s using an external power source (as opposed to 5 volts from the USB connection or other regulated power source). You can supply voltage through this pin, or, if supplying voltage via the power jack, access it through this pin. 
  • 5V.The regulated power supply used to power the microcontroller and other components on the board. This can come either from VIN via an on-board regulator, or be supplied by USB or another regulated 5V supply. 
  • 3V3.A 3.3 volt supply generated by the on-board FTDI chip. Maximum current draw is 50 mA. 
  • GND. Ground pins.

Memory

The ATmega1280 has 128 KB of flash memory for storing code (of which 4 KB is used for the bootloader), 8 KB of SRAM and 4 KB of EEPROM (which can be read and written with the EEPROM library).

Input and Output

Each of the 54 digital pins on the Mega can be used as an input or output, using pinMode(), digitalWrite(), and digitalRead() functions. They operate at 5 volts. Each pin can provide or receive a maximum of 40 mA and has an internal pull-up resistor (disconnected by default) of 20-50 kOhms. In addition, some pins have specialized functions:

  • Serial: 0 (RX) and 1 (TX); Serial 1: 19 (RX) and 18 (TX); Serial 2: 17 (RX) and 16 (TX); Serial 3: 15 (RX) and 14 (TX).Used to receive (RX) and transmit (TX) TTL serial data. Pins 0 and 1 are also connected to the corresponding pins of the FTDI USB-to-TTL Serial chip. 
  • External Interrupts: 2 (interrupt 0), 3 (interrupt 1), 18 (interrupt 5), 19 (interrupt 4), 20 (interrupt 3), and 21 (interrupt 2). These pins can be configured to trigger an interrupt on a low value, a rising or falling edge, or a change in value. See the attachInterrupt()function for details. 
  • PWM: 0 to 13. Provide 8-bit PWM output with the analogWrite()function. 
  • SPI: 50 (MISO), 51 (MOSI), 52 (SCK), 53 (SS).These pins support SPI communication, which, although provided by the underlying hardware, is not currently included in the Arduino language. The SPI pins are also broken out on the ICSP header, which is physically compatible with the Duemilanove and Diecimila. 
  • LED: 13.There is a built-in LED connected to digital pin 13. When the pin is HIGH value, the LED is on, when the pin is LOW, it’s off. 
  • I2C: 20 (SDA) and 21 (SCL). Support I2C (TWI) communication using the Wire library (documentation on the Wiring website). Note that these pins are not in the same location as the I2C pins on the Duemilanove or Diecimila.

The Mega has 16 analog inputs, each of which provide 10 bits of resolution (i.e. 1024 different values). By default they measure from ground to 5 volts, though is it possible to change the upper end of their range using the AREF pin and analogReference() function.

There are a couple of other pins on the board:

  • AREF. Reference voltage for the analog inputs. Used with analogReference(). 
  • Reset. Bring this line LOW to reset the microcontroller. Typically used to add a reset button to shields which block the one on the board.

Communication

The Arduino Mega has a number of facilities for communicating with a computer, another Arduino, or other microcontrollers. The ATmega1280 provides four hardware UARTs for TTL (5V) serial communication. An FTDI FT232RL on the board channels one of these over USB and the FTDI drivers (included with the Arduino software) provide a virtual com port to software on the computer. The Arduino software includes a serial monitor which allows simple textual data to be sent to and from the Arduino board. The RX and TX LEDs on the board will flash when data is being transmitted via the FTDI chip and USB connection to the computer (but not for serial communication on pins 0 and 1).

A SoftwareSerial library allows for serial communication on any of the Mega’s digital pins.

The ATmega1280 also supports I2C (TWI) and SPI communication. The Arduino software includes a Wire library to simplify use of the I2C bus; see the documentation on the Wiring website for details. To use the SPI communication, please see the ATmega1280 datasheet.

Programming

The Arduino Mega can be programmed with the Arduino software (download). For details, see the reference and tutorials.

The ATmega1280 on the Arduino Mega comes preburned with a bootloader that allows you to upload new code to it without the use of an external hardware programmer. It communicates using the original STK500 protocol (reference, C header files).

You can also bypass the bootloader and program the microcontroller through the ICSP (In-Circuit Serial Programming) header; see these instructions for details.

Automatic (Software) Reset

Rather then requiring a physical press of the reset button before an upload, the Arduino Mega is designed in a way that allows it to be reset by software running on a connected computer. One of the hardware flow control lines (DTR) of the FT232RL is connected to the reset line of the ATmega1280 via a 100 nanofarad capacitor. When this line is asserted (taken low), the reset line drops long enough to reset the chip. The Arduino software uses this capability to allow you to upload code by simply pressing the upload button in the Arduino environment. This means that the bootloader can have a shorter timeout, as the lowering of DTR can be well-coordinated with the start of the upload.

This setup has other implications. When the Mega is connected to either a computer running Mac OS X or Linux, it resets each time a connection is made to it from software (via USB). For the following half-second or so, the bootloader is running on the Mega. While it is programmed to ignore malformed data (i.e. anything besides an upload of new code), it will intercept the first few bytes of data sent to the board after a connection is opened. If a sketch running on the board receives one-time configuration or other data when it first starts, make sure that the software with which it communicates waits a second after opening the connection and before sending this data.

The Mega contains a trace that can be cut to disable the auto-reset. The pads on either side of the trace can be soldered together to re-enable it. It’s labeled “RESET-EN”. You may also be able to disable the auto-reset by connecting a 110 ohm resistor from 5V to the reset line; see this forum thread for details.

USB Overcurrent Protection

The Arduino Mega has a resettable polyfuse that protects your computer’s USB ports from shorts and overcurrent. Although most computers provide their own internal protection, the fuse provides an extra layer of protection. If more than 500 mA is applied to the USB port, the fuse will automatically break the connection until the short or overload is removed.

Physical Characteristics and Shield Compatibility

The maximum length and width of the Mega PCB are 4 and 2.1 inches respectively, with the USB connector and power jack extending beyond the former dimension. Three screw holes allow the board to be attached to a surface or case. Note that the distance between digital pins 7 and 8 is 160 mil (0.16″), not an even multiple of the 100 mil spacing of the other pins.

The Mega is designed to be compatible with most shields designed for the Diecimila or Duemilanove. Digital pins 0 to 13 (and the adjacent AREF and GND pins), analog inputs 0 to 5, the power header, and ICSP header are all in equivalent locations. Further the main UART (serial port) is located on the same pins (0 and 1), as are external interrupts 0 and 1 (pins 2 and 3 respectively). SPI is available through the ICSP header on both the Mega and Duemilanove / Diecimila. Please note that I2C is not located on the same pins on the Mega (20 and 21) as the Duemilanove / Diecimila (analog inputs 4 and 5).